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Most Common Barefoot Questions

How Do I Cross the Wake?

Need Equipment? Click here. Need Instructional Videos? Click here.

1. How Do I Cross the Wake Forward on Two Feet?
2. Rope length?
3. Speed?
4. Is there any way to practice before getting on the water?
5. Equipment?
6. Puppy Paws?
7. How Do I Cross the Wake Backwards on Two Feet?
8. How Do I Cross the Wake Forwards for One-Foot Crossings?
9. How Do I Cross the Wake Backwards for One-Foot Crossings?

1. How Do I Cross the Wake Forward on Two Feet?

Click here to read the entire article!

If you are one of the many people waiting for help on crossing the wake forwards, then you are in luck. I am about to help you "open a can of front slalom whoop-#@$$!"

We all love skiing and love to see a huge wall of water, but doesn't it get you pumped to think you could create a wall of spray that would make Andy Maples' look like a picket fence! And better yet, instead of using a six-foot ski, you can do it with your own signature-series bulletproof bare feet! I get fired-up just thinking about it.

If you are wondering why WaterSki Magazine isn't answering your questions with monthly barefoot tips, then fret not. I am going to do it in more depth than they ever would...and it is FREE!!!! "Things that make you go...Hmm..." (C&C Music Factory?)

Well I am going to outline two approaches. The first approach is for the educated risk taker. This is for the person who likes to be aggressive only after applying a little "wax-on wax-off" to the preparation phase.

The second approach is for the skier who prefers a good concussion to an intellectual read! Many of you will take this road...and enjoy the beating!

Approach number one (A personal and patented Lane "Dawg" guaranteed path to The Nirvana Slalom Land!)

Stage #1 Learn all one foots and toe-holds until you can be like Tigger the Tiger in the positions on the boom, the long-line, and on both sides of the wake. Required reading for this approach: Ankles and Angles, Tigger the Tiger Bouncy Trouncy Skiing

Stage #2 Learn two-foot and one-foot Cut-Aways (See video-http://www.thefootersedge.com/videos

Stage #3 Learn to cross the wake on two-feet and one-feet on Puppy Paws

Stage #4 Andy Maple gives you a call to ask you (as a professional courtesy) not to show-up at the Tour Stop as your signature-series feet are stealing his thunder! Stick sales plummet. Buoys become passé. He holds your trophy...you work the crowd.

Approach number two. No time for waxing. Take a good hard look at those bubbles. Think about what Rambo would do if he were you. Pull...push...simply WILL your way across that wake. Swallow the fear and do it again increasing the boat speed! That has got to help, right!?

Practice crossing the wake religiously using the following two principles;

Principle #1 WEIGHT TRANSFER-sure would be nice to be able to do a one-foot!

 Principal #2 EDGING

To transfer the weight you need to think of my patented Clock Theory of weight transfer! Picture your feet in the center of a clock and the back of your head over six-o-clock. If you want to go to your left, you need to transfer 90 percent of your weight to your right foot! To do this, move the back of your head (your upper body should follow!) over 4-o-clock. This is easy if your feet are close together.

Practice this weight transfer separately until you are fluid in transferring your weight from your right foot to your left foot while moving your head and body from 4-o-clock to 8-o-clock. Keep your feet parallel as you do this!

 So far you are just swaying from side to side. To get some actual S-curves happening, you need to learn to EDGE or CARVE!

 In a normal front gliding position (Ultra Mega Glide), you have the water all the way up to the ball of your foot, but not ON the ball of your foot. The foot is facing directly parallel with the boat. When edging, we transfer the weight to the inside edge of your foot in the same way that a slalom skier sets his edge on his ski. The water line on the foot can now actually move up onto the ball of your big toe in an extremely aggressive edge!

 But how does this happen without catching a toe? It is possible only when two critical things happen;

 #1 You push hard enough on your foot so that it is out in front of your knee! What???? Abandon the Ultra Mega Glide? Yes, but ONLY in front slalom! This is the ONLY time where the glide you have worked so hard on should be altered so that the water line can get on the edge of your foot!

 #2 The "pinky toe edge" is out of the water (to just over half way down your foot) because of the aggressive angle your foot has taken! Your foot is now at least 45 degrees off towards the direction you want to go!

 The more aggressively you work your weight transfer and your edging, the closer you will be to crossing on one foot. Your leading foot should be very light and pointed in the direction you want to go. Keep your feet close together so that weight transfer and edging are easier to achieve when you want to change direction.

 On your very first crossing on your feet, edge away from the wake at least 5-10 feet, change directions with the proper weight transfer and edge change, and the edge with constant resistance until you are at least 5-10 feet out the other side. After you have done this for a couple of passes, try to establish a slow and steady rhythm with smooth and carving turns!

 Lane Dawg's Top Slalom Tips

 #1 Position, position, position!

 #2 Keep your elbows close to your body by using a good shoulder role to the back, lat strength, and a little bit of bicep!

 #3 Ribs higher than elbows.

 #4 Keep the pull in your hips. The higher the handle the weaker your slalom!

 #5 Look across the wake out in front of you. Looking directly AT the wake could blind you!

 #6 Stay lower than normal. Keep you butt lower than your knee.

 #7 Try to get bouncy trouncy! It is more fun and it helps to establish a rhythm.

 #8 Get the video! www.thefootersedge.com/videos

 #9 Come to paradise and get YOUR unfair advantage! http://www.thefootersedge.com/skischool

 Well the plane is landing as I am off again to solve more small town problems with Posture and Glide!

 Let me know how you do!! Email me your success stories!



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2. Rope length?

Click here to read the entire article!

If you have a boat that was specifically designed for barefooting, the you would use the standard length that all competitors use in tournaments. That length is 75 feet.

If you have a boat that is not designed for barefooting, I would use 100 feet of rope. This will make the wake wider, but much softer and easier to cross!

I can’t wait to hear about your progress!


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3. Speed?

There are so many variations depending on skill level, shoe ski type, weight, whether or not you are using a Fly High extended skylon, etc...

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4. Is there any way to practice before getting on the water?

Click here to read the entire article!

Make sure and practice the techniques shown on my two hour video and in my Virtual Ski School.

With this mastered, you may take to the water with more confidence and preparation than I ever had when I was learning. While others rip their heads off, you will foot with the quiet confidence of a Jedi Warrior (Star Wars reference)!

You can get a 7 Day FREE Trial Membership of My Virtual Ski School only by clicking on the link below.
http://www.thefootersedge.com/newskischool/7daytrial.htm


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5. Equipment?

I believe that the very basics for barefoot slalom are as follows;

You must have a barefoot rope and slalom handle.

#1 The best barefoot wetsuit you can afford. I believe the best wetsuit on the market is Barefoot International's Iron Man wetsuit. I personally wear this suit and guarantee it to be at least 30% more protection than any other suit. It is an enormous advantage. You can see these suits and receive the best pricing anywhere along with free shipping by clicking here!

#2 I also believe that you MUST use padded shorts and that the best shorts out there are the Iron Man shorts. I unconditionally guarantee these shorts to be the best shorts of any kind in bare foot water skiing.

I highly recommend getting the best boom on the market since this also is a major safety issue. The Barefoot International boom and Fligh High extended pylon are the best out there. I also guarantee these to be the best out there.

Although I do not normally start barefooters out on shoe skis, it is critical to learning the more advanced tricks and are an absolute must for the serious barefooter. The Dawg Paws are the best shoe skis on the planet and I also have a less expensive shoe ski which you can see by visiting our Pro Shop.

If you have specific questions about any equipment, please submit them on the form below and I will post the answers here!


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6. Should I Wear Puppy Paws?

There is no substitute when you are learning slalom. Join those who have already gotten an unfair advantage! Get your own pair of Puppy Paws now!


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7.
How Do I Cross the Wake Backwards on Two Feet?

Click here to read the entire article!

Check out my additional extended back slalom information on my Virtual Ski School!

This is one of the points in your barefoot career that will test your patience and end up yielding some incredible fun. I believe back one-foot slalom to be one of the best feelings in the world! The good news is that what was once something only done by the best and strongest barefooters in the world, is now something that can be learned by anyone who follows my instruction down to the letter! If you are one of those hard core personalities that is willing to overlook short term set-backs in return for long term gain, then I will lead you to the promise land where your own personal miracles are waiting for you. If you are reading this thinking it is easy, then you will be disappointed. We have a tee-shirt that says simply, "We never said it was easy. We just said it was kool."

There are two ways that I know to go about this. The way I did it, and the way that I now teach my students of excellence to do it! The way that I did it was about a three year process of continual abuse and horrific crashes that kept my chiropractor in business. The way that I would like to help you is proven, methodical, and has worked for a tremendous amount of butt-kicking back one foot shredders!

There are several skills that should be mastered in order to make the transition to back one foot slalom:

#1 learn to do GREAT back toe-holds on both sides of the wake

#2 learn to do back-cut aways on both feet (as described in depth on my instructional video)

#3 learn to do back one-foot slalom on the Puppy Paws

The most important of these as far as priorities go is to learn your back toe-holds perfectly on the boom and then transfer them to the long-line. It is CRITICAL that you learn to do them on both sides of the wake without flying all over the place. Once you learn the back toe-hold correctly, it is quintessential that you learn to ski in the correct position with a very soft knee (on the water) to keep "tracking" straight while in the trick curl. If you are having trouble, learn to use the Puppy Paws while doing this exercise!

While working on this, you will want to learn to cross the wake on Puppy Paws on one foot. This will teach you balance and will point out any weak spots. The key to learning the back-one foot slalom on the Puppy Paws is to keep a good Power-Band, soft knee, good resistance, and then setting your foot on edge. A good way to describe this is to get in a great backwards position, and then picture your head being at the 12 o'clock position with your feet at six o'clock. If  you want to cut to your left, move your head and shoulders around the clock to the two o'clock position and your feet at the eight o'clock position. You will need to do this while "loading up with resistance without deteriorating your Posture and Glide. The key is to create an edge so the your feet are actually on the inside edge of your foot (the 'pinky-toe' side of your foot is pushed towards the boat and is out of the water). This is the same edging necessary for a slalom ski.

Once you are getting these other two skills up and running, try cutting away from the wake (while on your feet...or the Puppy Paws, at first) in the same manner as described above. Remember, set your position (Posture and Glide, Power-Band), add your resistance, and then set your edge. One of the biggest mistakes I see at this stage is people try so hard to edge that they allow their feet to go wide. This is counter productive and you must slow down your cross until you are at a pace that does not deteriorate your good position or cause your feet to go wide!

I guarantee that once you have mastered these skills, crossing the wake on one foot will come quickly to you. You will now have mastered all the skills separately that are needed for a good back one foot cross. The biggest mistake that you will make, yes...that means you!, is that you will not take the time to learn the back toes correctly.

What is amazing to me is that this is the same information that I get paid to teach people all over the world and I know that the biggest temptation out there is for skiers to modify what I have already proven to work.

Ask any of my students and they will tell you that I require EXCELLENCE in ALL of the toe-holds both forwards and backwards in order to achieve greatness in their skiing. I look forward to hearing of your individual triumphs in back slalom. Please do not accept mediocrity in your skiing!

TIPS:

#1 Use video analysis!

#2 Use the BEST instructional video on the planet

#3 MASTER BACK TOE HOLDS on BOTH sides of the wake!!!!!!!!!!!!!

#4 POSITION, RESISTANCE, EDGING

Let me know how your skiing goes and do your homework!

Email me with your progress. I am expecting a miracle for you!


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8.
How Do I Cross the Wake Forwards for One-Foot Crossings?

Click here to read the entire article!

If you are one of the many people waiting for help on crossing the wake forwards, then you are in luck. I am about to help you "open a can of front slalom whoop-#@$$!"

We all love skiing and love to see a huge wall of water, but doesn't it get you pumped to think you could create a wall of spray that would make Andy Maples' look like a picket fence! And better yet, instead of using a six-foot ski, you can do it with your own signature-series bulletproof bare feet! I get fired-up just thinking about it.

If you are wondering why WaterSki Magazine isn't answering your questions with monthly barefoot tips, then fret not. I am going to do it in more depth than they ever would...and it is FREE!!!! "Things that make you go...Hmm..." (C&C Music Factory?)

Well I am going to outline two approaches. The first approach is for the educated risk taker. This is for the person who likes to be aggressive only after applying a little "wax-on wax-off" to the preparation phase.

The second approach is for the skier who prefers a good concussion to an intellectual read! Many of you will take this road...and enjoy the beating!

Approach number one (A personal and patented Lane "Dawg" guaranteed path to The Nirvana Slalom Land!)

Stage #1 Learn all one foots and toe-holds until you can be like Tigger the Tiger in the positions on the boom, the long-line, and on both sides of the wake. Required reading for this approach: Ankles and Angles, Tigger the Tiger Bouncy Trouncy Skiing

Stage #2 Learn two-foot and one-foot Cut-Aways (See video-http://www.thefootersedge.com/videos

Stage #3 Learn to cross the wake on two-feet and one-feet on Puppy Paws

Stage #4 Andy Maple gives you a call to ask you (as a professional courtesy) not to show-up at the Tour Stop as your signature-series feet are stealing his thunder! Stick sales plummet. Buoys become passé. He holds your trophy...you work the crowd.

Approach number two. No time for waxing. Take a good hard look at those bubbles. Think about what Rambo would do if he were you. Pull...push...simply WILL your way across that wake. Swallow the fear and do it again increasing the boat speed! That has got to help, right!?

Practice crossing the wake religiously using the following two principles;

Principle #1 WEIGHT TRANSFER-sure would be nice to be able to do a one-foot!

 Principal #2 EDGING

To transfer the weight you need to think of my patented Clock Theory of weight transfer! Picture your feet in the center of a clock and the back of your head over six-o-clock. If you want to go to your left, you need to transfer 90 percent of your weight to your right foot! To do this, move the back of your head (your upper body should follow!) over 4-o-clock. This is easy if your feet are close together.

Practice this weight transfer separately until you are fluid in transferring your weight from your right foot to your left foot while moving your head and body from 4-o-clock to 8-o-clock. Keep your feet parallel as you do this!

 So far you are just swaying from side to side. To get some actual S-curves happening, you need to learn to EDGE or CARVE!

 In a normal front gliding position (Ultra Mega Glide), you have the water all the way up to the ball of your foot, but not ON the ball of your foot. The foot is facing directly parallel with the boat. When edging, we transfer the weight to the inside edge of your foot in the same way that a slalom skier sets his edge on his ski. The water line on the foot can now actually move up onto the ball of your big toe in an extremely aggressive edge!

 But how does this happen without catching a toe? It is possible only when two critical things happen;

 #1 You push hard enough on your foot so that it is out in front of your knee! What???? Abandon the Ultra Mega Glide? Yes, but ONLY in front slalom! This is the ONLY time where the glide you have worked so hard on should be altered so that the water line can get on the edge of your foot!

 #2 The "pinky toe edge" is out of the water (to just over half way down your foot) because of the aggressive angle your foot has taken! Your foot is now at least 45 degrees off towards the direction you want to go!

 The more aggressively you work your weight transfer and your edging, the closer you will be to crossing on one foot. Your leading foot should be very light and pointed in the direction you want to go. Keep your feet close together so that weight transfer and edging are easier to achieve when you want to change direction.

 On your very first crossing on your feet, edge away from the wake at least 5-10 feet, change directions with the proper weight transfer and edge change, and the edge with constant resistance until you are at least 5-10 feet out the other side. After you have done this for a couple of passes, try to establish a slow and steady rhythm with smooth and carving turns!

 Lane Dawg's Top Slalom Tips

 #1 Position, position, position!

 #2 Keep your elbows close to your body by using a good shoulder role to the back, lat strength, and a little bit of bicep!

 #3 Ribs higher than elbows.

 #4 Keep the pull in your hips. The higher the handle the weaker your slalom!

 #5 Look across the wake out in front of you. Looking directly AT the wake could blind you!

 #6 Stay lower than normal. Keep you butt lower than your knee.

 #7 Try to get bouncy trouncy! It is more fun and it helps to establish a rhythm.

 #8 Get the video! www.thefootersedge.com/videos

 #9 Come to paradise and get YOUR unfair advantage! http://www.thefootersedge.com/skischool

 Well the plane is landing as I am off again to solve more small town problems with Posture and Glide!

 Let me know how you do!! Email me your success stories!

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9. How Do I Cross the Wake Backwards for One-Foot Crossings?

Click here to read the entire article!

See my newest instructional video, “Back One-foot
Slalom,” at my all new Virtual Ski School!
http://www.thefootersedge.com/newskischool

If you can cross the wake backwards or are wanting to cross the wake backwards, I am going to give you the inside technology that will help you tear-up the lake withyour new and improved powerful backwards form. These
techniques must be mastered in your dry land practice. Those of you who have taken advantage of my Virtual Ski School, will have a huge advantage!

Here is my Lane Dawg Bower’s Short List for Success!

#1 Great position- yes…you know…Posture, Glide and POWERBAND!!!

#2 Learn to move around and be mobile!

#3 Load with RESISTANCE…maintaining resistance!

#4 Edging with the correct foot and body angle!

#5 Vision makes so-so slalom great or good slalom so-so.

As is typical with all of barefooting’s many challenges, concentrating on crossing the wake tends to distract skiers from maintaining a great position. Back slalom will definitely test your position and shred any bad form!

-------------------Great Position------------------------------------------

Here is a quick top to bottom reminder of great back form. I have covered this in great length so I am going to make this short. See my new instructional video for more details.

#1 Head up. Keep your eyes on the horizon.
http://www.thefootersedge.com/traumacenter/info/ne51.htm

#2 Shoulders rolled to the back with elbows up.

#3 Meat Hook those ribs so that they exhibit maximum expansion!
http://www.thefootersedge.com/traumacenter/info/ne6.htm

#4 POWERBAND your midsection and NEVER let that squeeze go!
http://www.thefootersedge.com/traumacenter/info/ne6.htm

#5 Soft knees
http://www.thefootersedge.com/traumacenter/info/ne17.htm

#6 Relaxed ankles
http://www.thefootersedge.com/traumacenter/info/ne17.htm

------------------Learning to Be Mobile--------------------------

Another great challenge in taking your back slalom up a notch is to learn to be able to move around. Most beginning back slalomers do not have mobility. If you cannot move the handle from one side of your body to the other or if you cannot bounce up and down in a relaxed manner, then you are currently stuck in the quagmire of immobility. This nasty mess can only be conquered
by learning to move in a manner which I affectionately call “Bouncy Trouncy Tigger the Tiger” skiing. You can read this in detail at
http://www.thefootersedge.com/traumacenter/info/ne17.htm

-----------------Learn to LOAD with Resistance------------------

There is nothing more aggravating than going through all the work of getting up backwards behind the boat only to be slammed at your very first motion into or away from the wake.

This problem is a matter of learning to resist from a great position. Please take time to read and practice my techniques written in my article “Falling on Back One-foot Slalom” at
http://www.thefootersedge.com/traumacenter/info/ne56.htm

In short, you need to be able to increase the amount of resistance you have against the boat without deteriorating your position or mobility! This is not difficult, but it does require practice on dry land as I show in this weeks’ Virtual Ski School Video.
http://www.thefootersedge.com/membervideopage/index.htm


After you learn to ski with more resistance, you must maintain that resistance through every phase of your back slalom. A change in resistance is like being shot out of a canon backwards and usually requires major rest and Advil (ibuprofen).

-----------------Edging----------------------------------------------

Back slalom cannot be conquered without learning to ski on the insteps of your feet! Think of your foot as a ski and learn to ski deep onto your instep keeping your “pinky toe” edge out of the water.

One way to learn to edge is to use my Clock Theory to manipulate your body to ski on your outside foot while learning to turn in the direction you want to ski. http://www.thefootersedge.com/traumacenter/info/ne21.htm

I short, if your normal position is facing “6 O’clock,” and you want to go to your right, move your head, shoulders, and hips over to your left or “4 O’clock” while pointing your heels in the opposite direction. As you do this, your weight should be dramatically transferred onto your left instep while keeping your increased resistance!

To go to your left, simply repeat in the opposite direction at 8 O’clock.

-----------------VISION---------------------------------------------

It seems so simple, yet 99% of all the people I transform into back slaloming machines, spend the majority of their time looking for fish instead of the horizon!

When you double-up on your Power Band, resistance, and edging, you will have to CRANK your neck upward just to see the horizon. My neck gets sore simply from working hard during my back slaom simply to maintain great vision. When I analyze someone’s vision, I should be able to clearly see that the skier’s shoulders and heard are higher than their butt.

It is very common in back slalom for the “headless back barefooter” to mysteriously show-up where once there was a skier with a perfectly good set of shoulder supporting a neck and head! I dramatically illustrate this in my new Back One Foot Slalom video at
http://www.thefootersedge.com/membervideopage/index.htm

Email me with your progress. I am expecting a miracle for you!


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The Footers Edge | Virtual Ski School

The Footer's Edge Training Center
Winter Haven, Florida
1-877-685-6270
Fax: 1-509-756-4343

lane@lanedawg.com